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University of St Andrews: Survival of the richest – attempts to curb illegal fishing are hurting small-scale fishers in Africa

Posted by Patricia Lumba on 24 November 2021 5:10 PM CAT
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Attempts to curb illegal fishing in African waters while turning a blind eye to large fishing fleets which are most damaging to fish stocks are putting small-scale fisheries at risk, according to new research from the University of St Andrews.

The research, published in Marine Policy, found that fishing restrictions and the advancement of fishing arrangements with Distant Water Fishing Nations (DWFNs) are causing small-scale fisheries to struggle financially despite being best placed to support local economies and food needs. Read more

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