Set an image for Conserving Aquatic Biodiversity in African Blue Economy

Sign In or Register

Conserving Aquatic Biodiversity in African Blue Economy

Networking
PUBLIC PROFILE

Fisheries Expert at AU-IBAR Dr. Mohamed Seisay says climate change poses threat to aquatic ecosystems

Posted by JUDITH DORA AKOLO on 09 December 2021 5:35 PM CAT
JUDITH DORA AKOLO photo

 

By Judith Akolo

An Expert in fisheries at the African Union – InterAfrican Bureau for Animal Resources (AU-IBAR) Dr. Mohamed Seisay has expressed worry over threats to aquatic biodiversity in Africa. He says the rising temperatures in the water bodies is forcing many species of fish to move deeper into the ocean, seas and lakes.

Speaking at the Conserving Aquatic Biodiversity in African Blue Economy meeting held in Naivasha, Dr. Seisay urged African Union member states to work towards increasing vegetation cover through planting trees as a mitigation measure in reducing carbon emissions.

“We need to implement strategies in order to encourage African Union member states to use nature based solutions like planting trees, so when you plant trees you minimize the effect of climate change on the wildlife and the aquatic ecosystems,” he said.

Dr. Seisay who is a fisheries expert notes that certain fish species have started moving deeper into the oceans, seas and lakes due to the warming temperatures in the shallow waters, a matter he said could complicate sustainable fisheries on the continent. “Climate change is one of the issues we are trying to address under this project, in order to have resilient aquatic ecosystems,” he said and added, “some of the fish species have a particular temperature that they can accommodate, if the temperature is very high due to climate change effect, when the species of fish moves, then it means the fisherfolk have a way of reaching them, at times is through have to use motorised boats.”

Dr. Seisay called for zonation of Lake Victoria in order to reduce conflicts among fisherfolk who use boats and canoes to fish and those that are engaged in fish farming using the cages. Dr. Seisay urged member states to also put in place guidelines and regulations that will guide fish farmers on sustainable ways of growing the fish without interfering with the ecosystem. “There is need to look at the kind of feed being used to feed the fish in terms of the density, so that it does not percolate into the entire ecosystem,” he said.

Studies by AU-IBAR have shown that overexploitation of living species, pollutions from several sources including land-based municipal, oil, gas and agricultural activities poses a threat to aquatic biodiversity. The report further indicates that, uncontrolled introduction of exotic species in aquaculture systems, effluents from mining activities are also among threats to sustainable aquatic ecosystems.

 

#BlueEconomy  #ClimateChange #Africa 

There are no comments

Sign in to add your comment.

Recent Posts

Aquatic Ecosystems: Climate Change posing great danger to aquatic life
Aquatic Ecosystems: Climate Change posing great danger to aquatic life - Dr. Mohamed Seisay, Senior...
read more
African Union Warns of Looming Fish Shortage (NTV News, Kenya)
read more
Conserving Aquatic Biodiversity in Context of the Africa Blue Economy
' Investing in the Blue Economy' - Dr. Nick Nwakpa (A/Director, AU-IBAR & Dr. Clement Adjorlolo,...
read more
AUDA-NEPAD says Blue Economy holds great potential for Africa's transformation
By Judith Akolo The FishGov-2 Project Manager at the African Union Development Agency – NEPAD...
read more
AU-IBAR builds capacity for AU member states in Blue Economy
By Judith Akolo As the world moves towards investment in the Blue Economy, the African Union –...
read more
Fisheries Expert at AU-IBAR Dr. Mohamed Seisay says climate change poses threat to aquatic ecosystems
By Judith Akolo An Expert in fisheries at the African Union – InterAfrican Bureau for Animal...
read more
Munya: Blue Economy is humanity's last frontier for development
By Judith Akolo Agriculture Cabinet Secretary Peter Munya says that Africa’s only hope in...
read more

Go to blog